Why you should attend Ch1Con!

Are you a young writer? Know a young writer? Tell them about the amazing Ch1Con (https://chapteroneconference.com/) happening August 5th in Chicago. It’s a conference put on by young writers for young writers ages roughly 11-23. The conference brings in top writers, agents, and speakers to get attendees started early on the pathway to success, all while also providing opportunities to find critique partners and learn the ropes of the publishing industry.

To learn more, check out an interview below with Julia Byers, Founder and Director of the Ch1Con, and afterwards, enter to win a copy of The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas!

Julia Byers photo
Julia Byers, Founder and Director of Ch1Con.

How did you come with the idea for Ch1Con?

We started Ch1Con my senior year of high school. The inspiration for it was twofold: when I was sixteen, I started attending the big, New York City writer’s conferences. While they were awesome and I learned A TON, I also felt rather alone at them because most of the attendees were adults (and the conferences were definitely geared towards adults). At the same time, some of my best friends in the world were teen writers I knew only online, and we were desperate to meet one another in person. So, I figured, why not kill two birds with one stone: by starting our own conference for young writers, teens like us would be able to learn about writing in an environment that was less daunting—and, you know, I’d get to spend a weekend hanging out with my amazing writer friends.

Why do you think it’s so important for young writers to have their own conference to attend?

As a young writer, it’s really easy to feel alone. Writing is awesome, of course, but it’s also naturally an isolating activity. And, as I mentioned in my previous answer, the huge writer’s conferences catered to adults are great opportunities—except they’re not really designed for kids (especially if you’re shy and awkward, like me), which makes them isolating as well.

And community is so important. Writing is a hard business, so it helps an incredible amount to have a support network in place, to have critique partners to help you fix your plot holes and friends to threaten to TP literary agents’ houses when they reject your magnum opus. [ Editor’s note: Please don’t TP agent’s houses 😉 ]

With Ch1Con, we strive to foster that type of community. Watching teen writers find critique partners and geek out about books together has been the absolute highlight of directing the conference.

What’s your favorite thing about the Ch1Con?

Sorry to use the word “community” a billion times, but I love how much of a community Ch1Con has become. I love how we’re small enough to feel intimate but big enough that we can bring in speakers like our keynote this year, Kody Keplinger (and, of course, the lovely Annie!). So much of what we’re doing now with the conference has developed from the attendees, speakers, and volunteers all just wanting to hang out together more, like our Friday night pizza party or everyone eating lunch together on Saturday during the conference.

Ch1Con might be a lot of work to put on, but it doesn’t feel like work; it feels like I’m spending the weekend hanging out with friends, gushing about OTPs and WIPs. I look forward to it all year.

How long have you been writing? Have you always found it easy?

I’ve been writing for longer than I can remember. My mom likes to talk about how, back before I knew how to read or write, I’d follow her around with a pencil and paper and make her write down my stories for me. (You might say I was a BIT of a handful growing up.) Honestly, though, writing has never really been “easy,” per say. I’ve always struggled with it. It’s just too much of a part of me to ever give up.

What advice would you give to young writers?

Keep going. I know it’s a cliché, but it’s also so important. This is a tough industry, but the really wonderful thing about it is that if you keep working hard and putting yourself out there, you will eventually reach your writing goals. It might not happen on the timeline you want it to, but it will someday. Don’t give up.

What’s your best writing tip?

Every story is a mystery. Whether you’re writing a contemporary romance, or high fantasy, or space opera (or, you know, a literal whodunit mystery), don’t forget to include plenty of clues and twists for the reader. It’s the reader trying to figure out what happens next that keeps them invested in the story. (And, you know, that’s something you want.)

What YA books are you most looking forward to in the near future?

Well, not in the near future, but I would be negligent not to mention The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (which we’re giving away as part of this post!). I’m currently reading it and there are no words to encompass quite how fantastic this book is.

Another book that just came out (but I’m so excited to read) is The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli.

Stuff that isn’t out yet that I’m looking forward to: They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera and No Good Deed by Goldy Moldavsky. (I’m kind of cheating with that last one, because I’ve already read it. But it’s hilarious and I highly recommend it when it releases!)

Thanks, Julia, for stopping by to tell us all about Ch1Con! I’ll be there this year, and I hope you will, too! Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of the The Hate U Give:

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The 1 Thing Authors Should Be Doing to Improve Their Writing

So many authors read blog post after blog post or book after book about writing, but too few authors put the time and money necessary into conferences.

I attended my first conference back in 2013, and even then, I had to be prodded into it by some writing friends. I didn’t see the point in spending money to learn about writing when I’d already paid to get a Masters degree in Creative Writing.

Boy, was I wrong! The conference I went to was called the Midwest Writers Workshop in Muncie, Indiana. To be honest, I went because I wanted a literary agent, and the conference offered me multiple opportunities to interact with and pitch agents. (Spoiler alert: what I learned at the conference and the feedback I got eventually helped me land my agent.) But the conference did so much more for me than just help me connect with agents.

The conference:

  • Offered great advice on perfecting my query letter.
  • Helped me learn new skills for revising, plotting, world building, character building, and other craft lessons.
  • Inspired me to get on Twitter where I connected with countless writers and publishing professionals.
  • Connected me with multiple critique partners.
  • Allowed me to talk with editors about what they were looking for.
  • Helped me establish relationships with big name authors.
  • Offered free help setting up my blog.

When you look at all the things you can gain by going to a conference, it’s worth the cost because you can’t get some of those things just from reading books about writing.

In that vein, I recognize conferences can be expensive once you add in travel and lodging. So if you can’t swing attending one in person, look for online ones. For example, WriteOnCon is a good one that’s very inexpensive. Another one you should check out that’s coming up soon is offered by the same Midwest Writers Workshop that I went to. It’s called Build a Better Plot with Shirley Jump.

Find out more about it here:

http://www.midwestwriters.org/2017/03/build-better-plot-shirley-jump-mww-ongoing-starts-march-27/

There could also be conferences offered in your state or through your local writing center.

The other conferences I’ll be attending this year as either a participant or panelist/speaker are:

Seven Sentences (presented by Maggie Stiefvater)

Nashville, Tennessee

April 2nd, 2017

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/seven-sentences-nashville-tickets-32341738009

(Note: Other dates and locations available)

 

Midwest Writers Workshop

Muncie, Indiana

July 20-22, 2017

http://www.midwestwriters.org/

 

Ch1Con

Chicago, Illinois

August 5th, 2017

https://chapteroneconference.com/

 

Will you be at any of these conferences or have a conference you want others to know about? Let me know in the comments.

 

The 5 Critique Partners Every Writer Needs

Have you ever finished a draft and thought, “Wow! That’s perfect!” If you have, congratulations. Please share your secret with the rest of us.

While I’ve certainly been excited about what I’ve written, I always recognize that it’s going to need to go through revisions. And the first revision always comes from my critique partners, also called beta readers by some. These are people I trust to look at my work with a critical eye and tell me where the story isn’t flowing or where something doesn’t make sense.

I highly encourage you to have more than one reader. I have a handful of readers, and I bring them in at different points in the process. My first reader is always my sister. (I know, I know, there’s a whole group out there who screams that you shouldn’t have family members read your work.) But my sister is one of my best readers and sharing it with her is an easy transition to sharing it with the world. Plus, she catches all my stupid spelling mistakes. But you’ll need a variety of readers with different skill sets in order to make your novel truly shine:

1.) Find the critique partner(s) you trust explicitly

Sure, you’re not going to agree with 100% of their comments, but this is the person you trust to be honest about your work. Use them first as that buffer between those tricky emotions of wanting to share your work and not wanting to share your work. This person should be encouraging but able to tell it to you straight.

2.) Find the critique partner who **gets your work**

After I edit based on my sister’s feedback, I have a writer friend I send to. Since she’s a writer, I can trust her to know how plots should flow and how characters should be developed. This is usually when I have to do a major revision because things need to be clarified or expanded upon. (Side note: all critique partners should **get your work,** and you may want to alternate who you send to first based on their workload, the type of story you’ve written, etc.)

3.) Find your “reserve” critique partners

Usually after my revisions from my second reader, I send my book off to my agent. But, why, you ask would I do that when I have so many other **AMAZING** critique partners available who also get my work? Here’s why, I like to use them strategically. Once my agent sends me her edits and I revise, I like to send the book to a new critique partner each time. Are they still pointing out the same lingering issues I’d thought I’d fixed for my agent? Have I inadvertently deleted a really important scene or bit of backstory while I was revising? These new readers will catch things like that.

4.) If you’re querying agents, save a critique partner for that step, too

I know you want everyone in the world to read your work before you send it off to agents, but save one or two critique partner’s for this step. Having someone who hasn’t read your book read your query letter can really help. They can point out what doesn’t make sense or where you’ve mentioned a character but not how they’re integral to the plot. They will come to your query letter with the same knowledge an agent would, so listen to them if something isn’t making sense. This can also apply to writing your synopsis, too.

5.) The “Good Grammar” critique partner

Sometimes it can help to have one critique partner who’s really good at grammar read through before you send off to agents/editors/etc. My mom is really good at this, and while most of my critique partners will point out errors, it doesn’t hurt to have someone you know you can count on to do a final read through. Alternatively, you could also hire an editor, but as long as you’re manuscript isn’t riddled with errors, one or two misplaced commas shouldn’t be a deal breaker for agents (just make sure those errors aren’t on your sample/opening pages because that could be a deal breaker!)

 

Some of these critique partners may be one and the same. The critique partner who gets your work may also be your Good Grammar critique partner. Or maybe you don’t need that buffer of a critique partner who can ease your book’s transition out to the world. It just comes down to knowing what you need and that you’ve got all your bases covered.

If you’re looking for critique partners, feel free to comment on this post with what you write (include if it’s Adult, YA, MG, etc) to see if you can find someone else who might be interested in partnering with you and trading work! Or, check out my blog next week when I list ways to find critique partners!

10 Things Writers Should Know About Writing Military Characters

Hey Ya’ll,

Before I begin to blather my 3rd grade dribble across the wonderfully pure pages of Annie’s site; I would like to thank her for her generosity in allowing me access to the airwaves. I would like to also thank all of you for caring enough about your writing to give this list a glance. I hope you find it useful, if you would like to ask more detailed questions, please contact me at robakers19@gmail.com

1.) In today’s age, no one was drafted.

The draft was abolished in the early 1970s so anyone who had been drafted has already retired. But that isn’t true of other nations or worlds (especially if you’re writing fantasy), so it is perfectly acceptable to have a character who was drafted or one who volunteered.

 

2.) Rank is based on experience and merit.

The rank structure is broken into two categories. Actually, it can be three but we should keep it simple for now. The junior ranks are the Enlisted ranks. The Officer ranks are the leadership structure of the military. Note that I am not listing the names for these ranks because it varies between the individual services. Generally speaking, the higher one progresses up the rank ladder, the less time they spend in the field and the more time they spend in an office making command decisions.

If your character is someone who needs to be in the action; make them a squad leader of 8-12 men with a mid-level Enlisted rank. If they are in command 30 men, make them platoon leader as a junior officer. If they are in command 200 men make them company commander as a mid-level Officer. If they are in command of the battalion of 1000 men or in command of an entire ship, they need to be a high-ranking officer but below the level of a General. In the modern military, Generals do not lead from the front and Privates do not make strategic decisions like authorizing the release of nuclear weapons.

 

3.) Nearly 99.9% of the Officer ranks have a college degree, but a vast majority of the Enlisted members also have a college degree.

The difference is that a college degree is a requirement to become an Officer while most Enlisted folks get their degrees after they join. There is a thing called a battlefield promotion. It isn’t a common practice in today’s military, but in World War II, it was not uncommon for exceptional Enlisted members to be promoted on the front lines to an Officer position. A common drinking toast of the junior officers of the British Navy is called the Ensign’s toast. They hold their drink up and offer a salute before they drink “To Death, War, and Famine.” At that time, the only way that they could progress up the ranks of command was for someone higher ranking to die.

 

4.) Not everyone has been shot at.

In fact, the actual number of people who have heard a bullet wiz by their head is relatively low. The vast majority of those who serve in the military have not been in combat. That doesn’t mean that their service is any less meaningful, just that they don’t have that experience even if they served in Iraq or Afghanistan. It is okay to have a character who served in Afghanistan for an entire year and never was in danger. Or you could have a character who was injured during their first encounter in combat. In Vietnam, the average life expectancy of a 1st Lieutenant in combat was nineteen seconds. If they survived that first day, then the odds were that they would survive the entire war.

plane-taking-off

Kuwait, winter 2004 with a C-130 taking off in background.

 

5.) Not everyone who has served will have PTSD, but PTSD is very real and it takes on many different forms.

The forms of PTSD are different and vary widely depending on the individual. Even two people who served side by side for the entire war can have different reactions to their shared experiences. I would not say that I have PTSD, but like clockwork, I become irritable with a vague sense of nerves every March. And it magically goes away in May. Usually my wife notices it first and will remind me of the date, and from that point on, I am able to control the feelings. But they are there, and they are very real. I know people who saw real combat and have no issues and others who have deeper issues. PTSD is a mental health issue, and if you choose to give your character this issue, it is okay if the cause is not something tragic. Ask any mother if they jump when they hear a baby cry. Ask them if they feel a need to aid that child. Ask them if they feel an internal sense of dread when they hear that cry. That is a common form of PTSD.

military-temp

Outside the tent in Qatar, June 2003. The temperature was almost 140 degrees.

 

6.) A military member is a regular person.

They can have any belief system that you chose to give them. They can be an atheist or extremely religious. They can be conservative or liberal. They can be heterosexual or homosexual. They can be tall or short. Fat or slim. For the most part, they will be in a descent physical condition as most handicaps or severe childhood diseases will eliminate them from service. But I know military members who recovered from cancer or had a traumatic battlefield injury. The thing to know is that they had to demonstrate an ability to perform all the tasks required for their job before they can return to service. Strokes, heart attacks, and diabetes are generally disqualifying events.

Your character can have any believe system that you choose. But the farther from the norm that you make them, then the more they will have to deal with their fellow teammates. I am sure there is an individual who is an ultra-liberal, homosexual, Christian, Navy SEAL. But that person would not only be rare, but they would get a lot of grief from their teammates. They would constantly be mocked, teased, and mentally abused. However, the only thing that his teammates would really care about is if the SEAL in question can do their job without hesitation. Because as much as you think it matters, all they really care about is if they can be trusted in the middle of a fight.

 

7.) Asking a young soldier to charge a hill requires a mentally that doesn’t exist in the civilian world.

The young soldiers have to be accepting of the fact that their life is meaningless when compared with the fate of the entire Army. They are taught in boot camp about the heroics of those who died in the past. These heroes have buildings named after them. They have camps named after them and entire bases named after them. They live on in history because they made the ultimate sacrifice. The men and women in boot camp are taught that to have eternal honor they must make eternal actions. The beginning of that process is to strip away the individual and promote the collective. That is why everyone in the military wears the same type of clothing, marches the same, salutes the same, and has all the other outward appearances of similarity.

 

8.) Every one in the military is different from their peers in some way.

There is a pack mentality among with the military, and that pack will attack any perceived weakness. In the civilian world, we would call it bullying. In the military, it would be called training. Everyone gets picked on because it is a rite of passage, and it is a test to see how they react to stress. If a person cannot take a cutting insult, then how will they react when their life is in danger?

 

9.) Most everyone has a nickname or a call sign.

This can take many forms, and it is not gender neutral either. I know of a lady who had a bad hair day and earned the name “Wolfie.” Sometimes, the name is given quickly based on their last name. Someone with the name of Bob Smith might be called “B.S.” or “Smithy.” Or their name might come from something they did. I have a friend called “Sleepy” because when he drinks alcohol, he tends to fall asleep.

 

10.) The men and women of the military don’t fight for big goals like freedom, democracy, or justice.

They might go to battle for something heroic and noble like one of these causes. But when the bullets start flying, they fight for only one thing: each other. That is the only reason that matters because their survival is dependent on the people in the fight. This is the only reason why one person would lay their life down for someone else. When I was in Iraq, I was in charge of a crew comprised of a wild-eyed southern boy, an African-American homosexual, a super smart atheist, a stanch Southern Baptist, and a self-proclaimed thief.

The six of us were together for 24/7 for six months straight. We slept eighteen inches apart, we showered together, we ate together, we laughed together, and we cried together. Never have I been closer to a group of people before or since. That was because we allowed each other to be individuals with respect. There was no topic that was off limits for discussion, but there was an understanding that we might not agree. But we depended on everyone else to do their job as professionals. We were a machine that accomplished every mission, and we returned with honor. But the truth is that we did everything to the best of our ability because we didn’t want to let down the other five men.

 

There you go. The top ten things that you need to know to write a convincing military character. Please, email me when you have questions.

 

Until next time, keep on rockin.

Rob

rob-bio-pic

About Robert Akers

Robert Akers holds a Bachelor Degree in Psychology from Arkansas State University and a Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Memphis. He began flying airplanes in 1991 before joining the West Virginia Air National Guard in 1995. He traveled to five continents and was deployed to Bosnia, Iraq, and Afghanistan as an Instructor Pilot. He left the military in 2008 at the rank of Major with four Air Medals, Five Aerial Achievement Medals, two Meritorious Service Medals, and two Humanitarian Medals among others. He is currently a 757 pilot with a major airline. He makes his home in West Virginia with his wife, two children, two cats, and one dog.

 

3 Tips for How to Write a Great Opening Line

It may be true that covers and jacket copy sell books, but you’re going to need a great opening line to even get to the point where someone’s going to pick up your book. Why’s that? Because you’ll need to wow both agents and editors with your opening line so they’ll keep reading.

What makes for a good opening line? It’s should have a good hook. You need something so compelling that the reader wants, no needs, to go on to the next sentence.

Here are 3 tips, with examples, so you can take your first lines to the next level.

1.) Use contrast

Compare:

Timothy took the school bus to Park Elementary, and today was like any other.

Vs.

Normally, Timothy took the school bus to Park Elementary, but today was no ordinary day because there was no bus in sight.

Don’t have your character start out with what they always do. Draw your reader in right from the start by having something new, something different going on. Plus, it can be a good way to show character by throwing them out of their comfort zone.

Famous example:

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…

(A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens)

 

2.) Leave your reader with questions

Compare:

Nina woke up and rolled over, pounding the alarm clock with her fist.

Vs.

Nina woke up and rolled over, only to discover she wasn’t in her bed anymore.

Did the first sentence really interest you? Maybe you’d read on, but there’s nothing dynamic there. There’s nothing unexpected there. The second one makes you stop and wonder where she is, how’d she get there, and what’s going to happen next.

(Note: Many agents and editors don’t always like it when a book starts with characters waking up, so keep that in mind.)

Famous example:

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

(1984 by George Orwell)

 

3.) Be unexpected

Compare:

Cinderella grew up with two evil stepsisters.

Vs.

Cinderella had never worn high heels.

The first line is expected, ordinary, common knowledge. The second one takes a little more thought. It catches you a little more off guard.

Famous example:

Marley was dead, to begin with.

(A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens)

 

Using these tips, you can take your opening lines from boring to extraordinary and increase the chances that agents and editors will want to read your work. What are your favorite opening lines from literature? Share them in the comments.

Forget Pantsers and Plotters: Be Like a Traveler Instead

It’s generally accepted that there are two schools of thought in how people approach writing: Pantsers and Plotters. Each has their benefits and challenges to the writing process.

What is a pantser?

People who “fly by the seat of their pants.” These writers don’t meticulously plan out the plot before they start writing. Pantsers aren’t wed to a story idea, which means they can be open to the creative muses that arise in the middle of writing – without it threatening the rest of their plot. These are the people who can walk into an airport and book the next departing flight to an exotic locale and not look back.

Downside: When you don’t know where you’re going, it’s easy to get lost. A story you thought was taking off could get stranded along the way if writers block sets in. For example, they’re the ones who didn’t book their tickets ahead of time to Dracula’s castle and had to wait 2 hours at the ticket window, losing valuable time because they didn’t plan ahead.

 

What is a plotter?

People who have exact road maps that they follow on the path to writing the words “The End.” Plotters know their scenes and what needs to be written. These are the people who have detailed itineraries to follow. They’ve been planning for months and have booked hotels and trains weeks in advance.

Downside: If they stay too tightly to their course, they may miss out on the things off the beaten path. For example, they bought the tickets to Dracula’s castle ahead of time but rushed through the rooms in order to make it to their next scheduled activity.

 

While these two different camps work well for many writers, perhaps there’s another approach somewhere between the hopping on the next flight and scheduling down to the minute. It’s what I call a Traveler because not only do you travel between the two extremes, but you do it like someone traveling the world would do by being open to new ideas while exploring your intended path.

While there will always be travelers who stick to their carefully detailed itineraries or the ones who have no itineraries at all, I’m not talking about them. I’m talking about the ones who know what country they want to go to. They’ve done enough research to know some of what they want to see. But, they’re not afraid to veer off course when they learn there’s a hidden waterfall that only the locals know about or to drop everything to go hear Desmond Tutu speak. Because it’s these special moments, the ones you didn’t expect, that create the best memories and will be the most memorable for your readers.

desmond-tutu-photo
Annie and her family meeting Desmond Tutu after hearing the day before about the opportunity.

So if you’re a pantser, try and at least look at the path so you’re not wandering around lost or trying fourteen different directions until you find the one that leads to the right path. And if you’re a plotter, don’t forget to stray from the path every once and a while. You might just discover something that will give your story the edge it was missing.

Are you a pantser or plotter? Or do you think you’re more of a hybrid Traveler? Let me know in the comments!

 

Who am I?

Hi! My name is Annie Sullivan. I’m a Young Adult and Picture Book author. I love writing about fantasy worlds and fairytale retellings. One of the best ways I’ve found to get inspired to come up with unique fantasy worlds is by traveling. So you’ll see a lot of tips for how to incorporate inspiration from around the world in upcoming blog posts.

When I’m not traveling and writing, I love reading (Meg Cabot, Madeleine L’Engle, and Jane Austen are a few favorites!), taking my dog for walks, watching movies (anything from classics, to Disney, to today’s top blockbusters!), and hanging out with my friends and family. I’m an expert four leaf clover finder (perhaps you could guess that I’ve got Irish ancestors!). I love anything sweet and can easily be bribed with food, and I’m one of those people who can listen to the same song over and over again when I’m writing.

So that’s me in a nutshell! Leave a comment with a little about yourself and what you’d love to learn about writing, traveling, or both!